meezees.compromoting

promoting products as affiliates

The home beauty treatment that risks millions looking bizarre – msnNOW

Experts warn home beauty treatment used by MILLIONS of Australians can cause chemical burns and leave you looking ‘bizarre’

  • Dentists have warned of the long-term effects of DIY teeth whitening kits
  • Australian Dental Association’s Laurie Walsh says they can cause chemical burns
  • Professor Walsh warns you can end up looking ‘bizarre’ with irreversible damage



<!–

<!–

<!–<!–

<!–

(function (src, d, tag){
var s = d.createElement(tag), prev = d.getElementsByTagName(tag)[0];
s.src = src;
prev.parentNode.insertBefore(s, prev);
}(“https://www.dailymail.co.uk/static/gunther/1.17.0/async_bundle–.js”, document, “script”));
<!–

DM.loadCSS(“https://www.dailymail.co.uk/static/gunther/gunther-2159/video_bundle–.css”);


<!–

Australians who use DIY teeth whitening kits without consulting a dentist risk irreversible damage that can leave them looking ‘bizarre’, experts have warned.

University of Queensland Professor Laurie Walsh claims more than 2.5 million could be ruining their smiles because fillings and some teeth stains cannot be bleached with the chemicals contained in over-the-counter treatments.

Professor Walsh, who is a member of the Australian Dental Association, says the potential side effects of home whitening products range from sensitive, discoloured teeth to chemical burns on the cheeks and gums.

Scroll down for video

Australians who use DIY teeth whitening kits without consulting a dentist risk irreversible damage that can leave them looking 'bizarre', experts have warned (stock image)

Australians who use DIY teeth whitening kits without consulting a dentist risk irreversible damage that can leave them looking 'bizarre', experts have warned (stock image)

Australians who use DIY teeth whitening kits without consulting a dentist risk irreversible damage that can leave them looking ‘bizarre’, experts have warned (stock image)

‘You end up looking bizarre, that would be the nicest word to describe it,’ Professor Walsh told AAP.

Teeth whitening is popular in Australia, with one in five choosing to bleach in 2020, according to a survey by the Australian Dental Association.

However less than half of those did so under the supervision of a dentist.

More than 50 percent used kits bought online or from a supermarket or pharmacy, and in an alarming revelation almost 65 percent of those surveyed said they had no idea about the risks of home whitening.

But it’s not difficult to see why so many opt for the DIY version.

Professional teeth whitening at accredited dentists can cost as much as $260 per tooth, while professional take-home kits cost an average of $610 – almost seven times more expensive than popular home kits from brands such as Advanced Teeth Whitening. 

DIY whitening is big business around the world, with the market projected to be worth a whopping $10.3billion globally by 2024.

But Professor Walsh insists only dentists can manage the associated risks by assessing their patients and determining if their teeth would respond well to the treatment.

He says the most common stains, caused by drinking tea and coffee, can be easily removed with a professional clean rather than bleach. 

Professor Walsh’s warning follows a move by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to allow dentists to give patients stronger whitening agents in take-home kits, opening access to products from the US.

Under current Australian laws, only dentists can use whitening products that contain more than six percent hydrogen peroxide – an active whitening agent used in over-the-counter and professional teeth whitening products.

The dangers of hydrogen peroxide falling into unqualified hands made headlines last year after an ‘extremely harmful’ craze for home bleaching went viral on TikTok.

Dental experts slammed the trend that saw thousands across the US, UK and Australia buy undiluted hydrogen peroxide to apply directly onto their teeth in the hope of achieving a brighter smile.

What is hydrogen peroxide and is it safe? 

Hydrogen peroxide is an acidic chemical compound that is used in household cleaner, hair bleach and teeth whitening products.

However in high concentrations it can be corrosive to the eyes, skin, and respiratory system. For this reason, it needs to be used with caution on people.  

In teeth whitening products, it works to dissolve stains. 

This can be done most safely when the amount of hydrogen peroxide can be carefully monitored. 

Risks increase if DIY solutions are made at home or if it is not applied correctly. 

Dentists warned using the chemical in such high concentration poses significant risk to oral health, including gum damage, weakened enamel, sensitivity and in the long-run, tooth loss.

Dr Reena Wadia, founder of London gum clinic RW Perio, said home kits offer significantly less protection than professional treatments. 

‘Professional teeth whitening systems use a custom-made tray that holds the hydrogen peroxide gel in contact with the teeth and prevents it from contacting the gum tissue,’ Dr Wadia explained.

‘This is important as if the gel touches the gums it can lead to gum irritation, inflammation and pain.’

She added: ‘Gums and bone hold your teeth in place so there is no point having white teeth if they start loosening up, changing position and eventually fall out.’ 

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top